The Science Times Book Of Genetics

✏Book Title : The Science Times Book of Genetics
✏Author : Nicholas Wade
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 1998
✏Pages : 248
✏ISBN : UVA:X004268229
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Science Times Book of Genetics Book Summary : Essays by experts in the field explore the history, research, processes, and ethical concerns of genetic research, including the role of genes in cancer and treatment, life extension, and cloning

✏Book Title : The New York Times Book of Genetics
✏Author : Nicholas Wade
✏Publisher : Globe Pequot
✏Release Date : 2002
✏Pages : 269
✏ISBN : 1585745316
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The New York Times Book of Genetics Book Summary : Essays by experts in the field explore the history, research, processes, and ethical concerns of genetic research, including the role of genes in cancer and treatment, life extension, and cloning.

✏Book Title : The New York Times Book of Science
✏Author : The New York Times
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 2015-09-29
✏Pages : 560
✏ISBN : 1402793219
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The New York Times Book of Science Book Summary : For more than 150 years, The New York Times has been in the forefront of science news reporting. These 125 articles from its archives are the very best, covering more than a century of scientific breakthroughs, setbacks, and mysteries. The varied topics range from chemistry to the cosmos, biology to ecology, genetics to artificial intelligence, all curated by the former editor of Science Times, David Corcoran. Big, informative, and wide-ranging, this journey through the scientific stories of our times is a must-have for all science enthusiasts.

📒A Troublesome Inheritance ✍ Nicholas Wade

✏Book Title : A Troublesome Inheritance
✏Author : Nicholas Wade
✏Publisher : Penguin
✏Release Date : 2014-05-06
✏Pages : 288
✏ISBN : 9780698163799
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏A Troublesome Inheritance Book Summary : Drawing on startling new evidence from the mapping of the genome, an explosive new account of the genetic basis of race and its role in the human story Fewer ideas have been more toxic or harmful than the idea of the biological reality of race, and with it the idea that humans of different races are biologically different from one another. For this understandable reason, the idea has been banished from polite academic conversation. Arguing that race is more than just a social construct can get a scholar run out of town, or at least off campus, on a rail. Human evolution, the consensus view insists, ended in prehistory. Inconveniently, as Nicholas Wade argues in A Troublesome Inheritance, the consensus view cannot be right. And in fact, we know that populations have changed in the past few thousand years—to be lactose tolerant, for example, and to survive at high altitudes. Race is not a bright-line distinction; by definition it means that the more human populations are kept apart, the more they evolve their own distinct traits under the selective pressure known as Darwinian evolution. For many thousands of years, most human populations stayed where they were and grew distinct, not just in outward appearance but in deeper senses as well. Wade, the longtime journalist covering genetic advances for The New York Times, draws widely on the work of scientists who have made crucial breakthroughs in establishing the reality of recent human evolution. The most provocative claims in this book involve the genetic basis of human social habits. What we might call middle-class social traits—thrift, docility, nonviolence—have been slowly but surely inculcated genetically within agrarian societies, Wade argues. These “values” obviously had a strong cultural component, but Wade points to evidence that agrarian societies evolved away from hunter-gatherer societies in some crucial respects. Also controversial are his findings regarding the genetic basis of traits we associate with intelligence, such as literacy and numeracy, in certain ethnic populations, including the Chinese and Ashkenazi Jews. Wade believes deeply in the fundamental equality of all human peoples. He also believes that science is best served by pursuing the truth without fear, and if his mission to arrive at a coherent summa of what the new genetic science does and does not tell us about race and human history leads straight into a minefield, then so be it. This will not be the last word on the subject, but it will begin a powerful and overdue conversation. From the Trade Paperback edition.

📒Living With Our Genes ✍ Dean H. Hamer

✏Book Title : Living with Our Genes
✏Author : Dean H. Hamer
✏Publisher : Anchor
✏Release Date : 2011-07-27
✏Pages : 368
✏ISBN : 9780307803306
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Living with Our Genes Book Summary : "A lucid, thought-provoking account of the case for 'nature' as a determinant of personality." —Peter D. Kramer, Author of Listening to Prozac and Should You Leave? Nowhere is the nature-nuture controversy being more arduously tested than in the labs of world-renowned molecular scientist Dean Hamer, whose cutting-edge research has indisputably linked specific genes to behavioral traits, such as anxiety, thrill-seeking, and homosexuality. The culmination of that research os this provocative book, Living with Our Genes. In it, Dr. Hamer reveals that much of our behavior—how much we eat and weigh, whether we drink or use drugs, how often we have sex—is heavily influenced by genes. His findings help explain why one brother becomes a Wall Street trader, while his sibling remains content as a librarian, or why some people like to bungee-jump, while others prefer Scrabble. Dr. Hamer also sheds light on some of the most compelling and vexing aspects of personality, such as shyness, aggression, depression, and intelligence. In the tradition of the bestselling book Listening to Prozac, Living with Our Genes is the first comprehensive investigation of the crucial link between our DNA and our behavior. "Compulsive reading, reminiscent of Jared Diamond, froma scientsit who knows his stuff and communicates it well." —Kirkus Reviews "A pioneer in the field of molecular psychology, Hamer is exploring the role genes play in governing the very core of our individuality. Accessible...provocative." —Time "Absolutely terrific! I couldn't put it down." —Professor Robert Plomin, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Research Center, Institute of Psychiatry

📒The Lysenko Affair ✍ David Joravsky

✏Book Title : The Lysenko Affair
✏Author : David Joravsky
✏Publisher : University of Chicago Press
✏Release Date : 2010-12-15
✏Pages : 474
✏ISBN : 0226410323
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Lysenko Affair Book Summary : The Lysenko affair was perhaps the most bizarre chapter in the history of modern science. For thirty years, until 1965, Soviet genetics was dominated by a fanatical agronomist who achieved dictatorial power over genetics and plant science as well as agronomy. "A standard source both for Soviet specialists and for sociologists of science."—American Journal of Sociology "Joravsky has produced . . . the most detailed and authoritative treatment of Lysenko and his view on genetics."—New York Times Book Review

📒The Basics Of Biology ✍ Carol Leth Stone

✏Book Title : The Basics of Biology
✏Author : Carol Leth Stone
✏Publisher : Greenwood Publishing Group
✏Release Date : 2004
✏Pages : 280
✏ISBN : 0313317860
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Basics of Biology Book Summary : An introduction to biology describes the discipline's history, explains its basic theories and concepts, demonstrates modern methods and research tools, and discusses noteworthy discoveries.

✏Book Title : She Has Her Mother s Laugh
✏Author : Carl Zimmer
✏Publisher : Penguin
✏Release Date : 2018-05-29
✏Pages : 672
✏ISBN : 9781101984604
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏She Has Her Mother s Laugh Book Summary : 2019 PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award Finalist "Science book of the year"—The Guardian One of New York Times 100 Notable Books for 2018 One of Publishers Weekly's Top Ten Books of 2018 One of Kirkus's Best Books of 2018 One of Mental Floss's Best Books of 2018 One of Science Friday's Best Science Books of 2018 “Extraordinary”—New York Times Book Review "Magisterial"—The Atlantic "Engrossing"—Wired "Leading contender as the most outstanding nonfiction work of the year"—Minneapolis Star-Tribune Celebrated New York Times columnist and science writer Carl Zimmer presents a profoundly original perspective on what we pass along from generation to generation. Charles Darwin played a crucial part in turning heredity into a scientific question, and yet he failed spectacularly to answer it. The birth of genetics in the early 1900s seemed to do precisely that. Gradually, people translated their old notions about heredity into a language of genes. As the technology for studying genes became cheaper, millions of people ordered genetic tests to link themselves to missing parents, to distant ancestors, to ethnic identities... But, Zimmer writes, “Each of us carries an amalgam of fragments of DNA, stitched together from some of our many ancestors. Each piece has its own ancestry, traveling a different path back through human history. A particular fragment may sometimes be cause for worry, but most of our DNA influences who we are—our appearance, our height, our penchants—in inconceivably subtle ways.” Heredity isn’t just about genes that pass from parent to child. Heredity continues within our own bodies, as a single cell gives rise to trillions of cells that make up our bodies. We say we inherit genes from our ancestors—using a word that once referred to kingdoms and estates—but we inherit other things that matter as much or more to our lives, from microbes to technologies we use to make life more comfortable. We need a new definition of what heredity is and, through Carl Zimmer’s lucid exposition and storytelling, this resounding tour de force delivers it. Weaving historical and current scientific research, his own experience with his two daughters, and the kind of original reporting expected of one of the world’s best science journalists, Zimmer ultimately unpacks urgent bioethical quandaries arising from new biomedical technologies, but also long-standing presumptions about who we really are and what we can pass on to future generations.

📒Cats Are Not Peas ✍ Laura Gould

✏Book Title : Cats Are Not Peas
✏Author : Laura Gould
✏Publisher : CRC Press
✏Release Date : 2008-02-08
✏Pages : 312
✏ISBN : 9781439865033
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Cats Are Not Peas Book Summary : The Vets Turn Pale. . . George, a male calico, was a genetic anomaly, a manifestation of something that isn't supposed to happen, a creature so rare that even most veterinarians have never seen one. His curious existence sparked Laura Gould's long search through the archives of genetics to unearth the charming and valiant roles played by early cat geneticists, as well as cats themselves, in the study of genes and how they work. For everyone with an interest in cats and cat breeding, this is an unforgettable and often hilarious account of the intersecting lives of cats and geneticists. The field of genetics has exploded since 1992, when the first edition of Cats Are Not Peas was completed. Thus a lengthy Addendum is included in this new edition, providing the reader with the terminology and concepts needed to understand two burgeoning new areas in which cats have again had significant roles to play---the sequencing of genomes and the production of clones. These descriptions allow you to view with increasing wonder the world around you and to think seriously about whether you would like to have your personal genome mapped or your cat cloned, both of which are now possible (if you can afford it).

✏Book Title : The Invisible History of the Human Race
✏Author : Christine Kenneally
✏Publisher : Penguin
✏Release Date : 2014-10-09
✏Pages : 368
✏ISBN : 9780698176294
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Invisible History of the Human Race Book Summary : • A New York Times Notable Book • “The richest, freshest, most fun book on genetics in some time.” —The New York Times Book Review We are doomed to repeat history if we fail to learn from it, but how are we affected by the forces that are invisible to us? In The Invisible History of the Human Race Christine Kenneally draws on cutting-edge research to reveal how both historical artifacts and DNA tell us where we come from and where we may be going. While some books explore our genetic inheritance and popular television shows celebrate ancestry, this is the first book to explore how everything from DNA to emotions to names and the stories that form our lives are all part of our human legacy. Kenneally shows how trust is inherited in Africa, silence is passed down in Tasmania, and how the history of nations is written in our DNA. From fateful, ancient encounters to modern mass migrations and medical diagnoses, Kenneally explains how the forces that shaped the history of the world ultimately shape each human who inhabits it. The Invisible History of the Human Race is a deeply researched, carefully crafted and provocative perspective on how our stories, psychology, and genetics affect our past and our future. From the Hardcover edition.