The Malay Muslim Insurgency In Southern Thailand

✏Book Title : The Malay Muslim Insurgency in Southern Thailand
✏Author : Peter Chalk
✏Publisher : Rand Corporation
✏Release Date : 2008
✏Pages : 27
✏ISBN : 9780833044686
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Malay Muslim Insurgency in Southern Thailand Book Summary : Current unrest in the Malay-Muslim provinces of southern Thailand has captured growing national, regional, and international attention due to the heightened tempo and scale of rebel attacks, the increasingly jihadist undertone that has come to characterize insurgent actions, and the central government's often brutal handling of the situation on the ground. This paper assesses the current situation and its probable direction.

✏Book Title : A Handbook of Terrorism and Insurgency in Southeast Asia
✏Author : Andrew T. H. Tan
✏Publisher : Edward Elgar Publishing
✏Release Date : 2009-01-01
✏Pages : 520
✏ISBN : 9781847207180
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏A Handbook of Terrorism and Insurgency in Southeast Asia Book Summary : This is an important and worthwhile book that should be read by anyone seeking to understand the history and evolution of political violence in Southeast Asia, including the origins of contemporary militant Islamist terrorism. Paul J. Smith, Contemporary Southeast Asia This very fine collection shows how and why Southeast Asia has been afflicted with terrorism from the end of World War II to the present time. No other volume tells us as much about the period and area. Anyone interested in the general theory and practice of terrorism and insurgency will find it indispensable. David C. Rapoport, University of California, Los Angeles, US and Editor of Journal of Terrorism and Political Violence This stimulating collection of essays underlines how Southeast Asia has again, as at the height of the Cold War, been pushed towards the top of the list of world conflict zones by the collision between long-standing regional problems and more recent external frictions. Anyone needing to learn more about the relationship between the war on terror and Southeast Asia, particularly regarding terrorism in Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines, will need to consult this work. Brian P. Farrell, National University of Singapore, and author of The Defence and Fall of Singapore 1940 1942 This book is an excellent addition to the literature on political violence in Southeast Asia providing a wealth of detail on terrorism, guerilla insurgency, and the use of terror and repression by governments. The book is especially valuable for the broad coverage of many different groups (not just Islamic ones), inclusion of the activities of governments, and a variety of opinions and views on terrorism and political violence. This book should be one of the essential resources for academics, policymakers, or anyone else interested in terrorism, insurgency, and political violence in the region. It is an extremely valuable tool for one and all. James M. Lutz, Indiana University Purdue University, US and co-author of Global Terrorism, with Brenda Lutz This is an excellent volume, which is very well conceived and balanced in its treatment of the problem of terrorism and insurgency in Southeast Asia. This volume will greatly advance our empirical understanding of conflict and violence in this pivotal region. The book contains many insightful contributions and, overall, the Handbook will serve as a standard reference on the subject matter for years to come. M.L.R. Smith, King s College, University of London, UK This timely and significant book seeks to explain the deep-seated complexities of terrorism and insurgency in Southeast Asia. In the aftermath of 9/11, this region has been designated by the United States to be the second front in the war on terrorism. Yet despite the emergence of this new global terrorism, the authors argue that armed rebellion in Southeast Asia is a phenomenon that predates Al Qaeda and the global Jihadist movement and that much can be learned from the motivations behind it. Written by a group of leading Western and emerging Southeast Asian scholars, this extensive volume demonstrates the difficulty and diversity of rebellion in Southeast Asia, and explores its intricate historical, political, social and economic roots. The book will serve as an excellent reference and educational text, providing an empirical and regional guide to the complex problem of insurgency in Southeast Asia. It will also contribute to a more educated understanding that could provide the basis for appropriate counter-terrorism strategies in this important part of the world. Comprehensive and engaging, this volume will find widespread appeal amongst researchers, students and policymakers interested in terrorism, international relations and Asian studies and will also be an invaluable tool for studies into political violence and security.

✏Book Title : Security Strategies in the Asia Pacific
✏Author : A. Tan
✏Publisher : Springer
✏Release Date : 2011-08-01
✏Pages : 264
✏ISBN : 9780230339156
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Security Strategies in the Asia Pacific Book Summary : This book argues that, given the existence of a discrete Malay archipelago security complex, it is a fallacy for the United States to approach this region primarily through the prism of global counter-terrorism

✏Book Title : Ethnic Groups of South Asia and the Pacific
✏Author : James Minahan
✏Publisher : ABC-CLIO
✏Release Date : 2012
✏Pages : 403
✏ISBN : 9781598846591
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Ethnic Groups of South Asia and the Pacific Book Summary : This comprehensive guide to the Pacific and South Asia provides detailed and enlightening information about the many ethnic groups of this increasingly important region of the world.

✏Book Title : Deciphering Southern Thailand s Violence
✏Author : Sascha Helbardt
✏Publisher : ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute
✏Release Date : 2015-08-14
✏Pages : 257
✏ISBN : 9789814519625
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Deciphering Southern Thailand s Violence Book Summary : Scholars have given questions about the perpetrators of nameless violence in Southern Thailand little consideration, leaving the motives that drive Barisan Revolusi Nasional (BRN) heavily cloaked in secrecy and speculation. This book offers a rare glimpse behind the veil that shrouds BRN-Coordinate. Using exclusive access to and detailed interviews with BRN-Coordinate members, this book analyses the communicative dimension of the insurgency. It depicts the hidden channels and organized violence that drive the regions enduring rebellion as well as BRN's dichotomous existence between silence and communication.

✏Book Title : The Ongoing Insurgency in Southern Thailand Trends in Violence Counterinsurgency Operations and the Impact of National Politics
✏Author : Zachary Abuza
✏Publisher : CreateSpace
✏Release Date : 2012-07-06
✏Pages : 44
✏ISBN : 147819944X
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Ongoing Insurgency in Southern Thailand Trends in Violence Counterinsurgency Operations and the Impact of National Politics Book Summary : Since January 2004, a Malay-Muslim-based insurgency has engulfed the three southernmost provinces in Thailand. More than 4,500 people have been killed and over 9,000 wounded, making it the most lethal conflict in Southeast Asia. Now in its 8th year, the insurgency has settled into a low-level stalemate. Violence is down significantly from its mid-2007 peak, but it has been steadily climbing since 2008. On average, 32 people are being killed and 58 wounded every month. Most casualties are from drive-by shootings, but there are also about 12 improvised explosive device (IED) attacks a month. The insurgency is now characterized by less indiscriminate violence and more retaliatory attacks. Insurgents continue to target security forces, government officials, and Muslim moderates who seek accommodation with the Thai state as part of efforts to make the region ungovernable by limiting provision of social services and driving Buddhists from the south. The overall level of violence may be influenced more by insurgent calculations about the optimum amount of violence needed to advance their political goals than by improved capabilities of the security forces. Despite better coordination, Thai counterinsurgency operations are still hampered by bureaucratic infighting and a lack of professionalism. Human rights abuses by security services with blanket immunity under the Emergency Decree continue to instill mistrust among the local population. Moreover, as long as violence is contained in the deep south, the insurgency will remain a low priority for the new Thai government, which is focused on national political disputes and is reluctant to take on the military by pursuing more conciliatory policies toward the south. Indeed, even under the 30-month tenure of the Democrat Party with an electoral base in the south, the insurgency was a very low priority and its few policy initiatives were insufficient to quell the violence. The new Pheu Thai government under Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, the younger sister of Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted in a September 2006 coup, will have its hands tied in the south. Its election victory and focus on national reconciliation have already engendered mistrust of the Thai military. The new government will be reluctant to criticize the military's handling of the insurgency, take on the culture of impunity, or push for any form of political autonomy. This will make any devolution of political authority unlikely, limiting chances for a negotiated solution. As a result, low level violence is likely to continue indefinitely. The most important immediate U.S. objective in Thailand is political stability at the national level and deepening bilateral economic ties. Absent a cohesive Thai government with the political will to overcome military resistance to policies that might address underlying causes of the insurgency, U.S. pressure to do more is likely to be ineffective or even counterproductive. Accordingly, the United States should maintain quiet diplomatic pressure on the government to broaden its counterinsurgency efforts and offer any requested intelligence and law enforcement assistance, while being cognizant of Thai sensitivity over its sovereignty.

📒A Muslim Archipelago Islam And Politics In Southeast Asia ✍ Center for Strategic Intelligence Research (U.S.)

✏Book Title : A Muslim archipelago Islam and Politics in Southeast Asia
✏Author : Center for Strategic Intelligence Research (U.S.)
✏Publisher : Government Printing Office
✏Release Date :
✏Pages :
✏ISBN : 016086920X
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏A Muslim archipelago Islam and Politics in Southeast Asia Book Summary :

✏Book Title : The Ongoing Insurgency in Southern Thailand
✏Author : Zachary Abuza
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 2011
✏Pages : 35
✏ISBN : UCBK:C111889360
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Ongoing Insurgency in Southern Thailand Book Summary : "Since January 2004, a Malay-Muslim-based insurgency has engulfed the three southernmost provinces in Thailand. More than 4,500 people have been killed and over 9,000 wounded, making it the most lethal conflict in Southeast Asia. Now in its 8th year, the insurgency has settled into a low-level stalemate. Violence is down significantly from its mid-2007 peak, but it has been steadily climbing since 2008. On average, 32 people are being killed and 58 wounded every month. Most casualties are from drive-by shootings, but there are also about 12 improvised explosive device (IED) attacks a month. The insurgency is now characterized by less indiscriminate violence and more retaliatory attacks. Insurgents continue to target security forces, government officials, and Muslim moderates who seek accommodation with the Thai state as part of efforts to make the region ungovernable by limiting provision of social services and driving Buddhists from the south. The overall level of violence may be influenced more by insurgent calculations about the optimum amount of violence needed to advance their political goals than by improved capabilities of the security forces. Despite better coordination, Thai counterinsurgency operations are still hampered by bureaucratic infighting and a lack of professionalism. Human rights abuses by security services with blanket immunity under the Emergency Decree continue to instill mistrust among the local population. Moreover, as long as violence is contained in the deep south, the insurgency will remain a low priority for the new Thai government, which is focused on national political disputes and is reluctant to take on the military by pursuing more conciliatory policies toward the south. Indeed, even under the 30-month tenure of the Democrat Party with an electoral base in the south, the insurgency was a very low priority and its few policy initiatives were insufficient to quell the violence. The new Pheu Thai government under Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, the younger sister of Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted in a September 2006 coup, will have its hands tied in the south. Its election victory and focus on national reconciliation have already engendered mistrust of the Thai military. The new government will be reluctant to criticize the military's handling of the insurgency, take on the culture of impunity, or push for any form of political autonomy. This will make any devolution of political authority unlikely, limiting chances for a negotiated solution. As a result, low level violence is likely to continue indefinitely. The most important immediate U.S. objective in Thailand is political stability at the national level and deepening bilateral economic ties. Absent a cohesive Thai government with the political will to overcome military resistance to policies that might address underlying causes of the insurgency, U.S. pressure to do more is likely to be ineffective or even counterproductive. Accordingly, the United States should maintain quiet diplomatic pressure on the government to broaden its counterinsurgency efforts and offer any requested intelligence and law enforcement assistance, while being cognizant of Thai sensitivity over its sovereignty."--P. 1-2.

📒Promoting Conflict Or Peace Through Identity ✍ Dr Nikki R Slocum-Bradley

✏Book Title : Promoting Conflict or Peace through Identity
✏Author : Dr Nikki R Slocum-Bradley
✏Publisher : Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
✏Release Date : 2013-03-28
✏Pages : 242
✏ISBN : 9781409498858
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Promoting Conflict or Peace through Identity Book Summary : Developing a solid basis for future research and training, this illuminating volume facilitates peace and mutual understanding between people by addressing a root cause of social conflicts: identity constructions. The volume encompasses eight revealing empirical case studies from regions throughout the world, conducted by experts from diverse disciplinary backgrounds. Each case study examines how identities are being constructed and used in the region, how these identities are related to borders and in what ways identity constructions foment peace or conflict. The volume summarizes insights gleaned from these studies and formulates an analytical framework for understanding the role of identity constructions in conflict or peace.

✏Book Title : Islam Education and Reform in Southern Thailand
✏Author : Joseph Chinyong Liow
✏Publisher : Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
✏Release Date : 2009
✏Pages : 218
✏ISBN : 9789812309549
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Islam Education and Reform in Southern Thailand Book Summary : "This is a remarkable piece of scholarship that illuminates general and specific tendencies in Islamic education in South Thailand. Armed with an enormous amount of rich empirical detail and an elegant writing style, the author debunks the simplistic Orientalist conceptions of Wahhabi and Salafi influences on Islamic education in South Thailand. This work will be a state-of-the-art source for understanding the role of Islam and the ongoing conflict in this troubled region of Southeast Asia. The book is significant for those scholars who are attempting to understand Muslim communities in Southeast Asia, and also for those who want deep insights into Islamic education and its influence in any area of the Islamic world." - Raymond Scupin, Professor of Anthropology and International Studies Lindenwood University, USA "Few books address the sensitive issue of Islamic education with empathy as well as critical distance as Joseph C. Liow's Islam, Education, and Reform in Southern Thailand. He examines global networks of religious learning within a local Thai as well as regional Asian context by brilliantly revealing the intersections between religion, politics and modernity in an accessible and illuminating manner. Traditional educational institutions rarely receive such sensitive and balanced treatment. Liow's book is a tour de force and mandatory reading for policy-makers, academics and all of those interested in current affairs." - Ebrahim Moosa, Associate Professor of Islamic Studies, Department of Religion, Associate Director, Duke Islamic Studies Center (DISC), Duke University, USA "Islam, Education, and Reform in Southern Thailand is Joseph Chinyong Liow's critical attempt to map out the reflexive questioning, locations of authority, dynamics and contestations within the Muslim community over what constitutes Islamic knowledge and education. Through the optics of Islamic education in Southern Thailand, Liow manages to brilliantly portray the ways in which Muslim minority negotiate their lives in the local context of violence and the global context of crisis of modernity." - Chaiwat Satha-Anand, Senior Research Scholar, Thailand Research Fund, Author of The Life of this World: Negotiated Muslim Lives in Thai Society