The Divine Comedy The Inferno Purgatorio And Paradiso

✏Book Title : The Divine Comedy Inferno Purgatorio Paradiso
✏Author : Dante Alighieri
✏Publisher : e-artnow
✏Release Date : 2018-12-21
✏Pages : 412
✏ISBN : 9788027247097
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Divine Comedy Inferno Purgatorio Paradiso Book Summary : This eBook edition of "The Divine Comedy: Inferno, Purgatorio & Paradiso" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices.Divine Comedy is one of the greatest works of world literature. The poem's imaginative vision of the afterlife is representative of the medieval world-view. The narrative describes Dante's travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise or Heaven, while allegorically the poem represents the soul's journey towards God.Contents:Divine ComedyInfernoPurgatorioParadisoSix Sonnets on Dante's Divine Comedy

✏Book Title : The Divine Comedy the Inferno Purgatorio and Paradiso
✏Author : Dante Alighieri
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 1948
✏Pages : 188
✏ISBN : UVA:X000276339
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Divine Comedy the Inferno Purgatorio and Paradiso Book Summary :

📒The Divine Comedy ✍ Dante Alighieri

✏Book Title : The Divine Comedy
✏Author : Dante Alighieri
✏Publisher : Courier Dover Publications
✏Release Date : 2017-06-21
✏Pages : 848
✏ISBN : 9780486815657
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Divine Comedy Book Summary : "This Dover edition, first published in 2017, is an unabridged republication of The Divine Comedy, translated and with Notes by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, originally published in 1867 by George Routledge & Sons, London"--Title page verso.

📒Dante S Divine Comedy ✍ Dante Alighieri

✏Book Title : Dante s Divine Comedy
✏Author : Dante Alighieri
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 1893
✏Pages : 246
✏ISBN : UOM:39015066620256
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Dante s Divine Comedy Book Summary :

✏Book Title : The Divine Comedy
✏Author : Barry
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 2018-11-17
✏Pages : 706
✏ISBN : 1731476213
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Divine Comedy Book Summary : The Divine Comedy describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman epic poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and another of his works, "La Vita Nuova." While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand. Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui manc possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).Dante wrote the Comedy in a new language he called "Italian," based on the regional dialects of Tuscany, Sicilian and some elements of Latin and other regional dialects. By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression. In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante. Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity). This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.

✏Book Title : The Divine Comedy
✏Author :
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 1948
✏Pages : 188
✏ISBN : OCLC:476572275
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Divine Comedy Book Summary :

📒Divine Comedy I ✍ Dante Alighieri

✏Book Title : Divine Comedy I
✏Author : Dante Alighieri
✏Publisher : CreateSpace
✏Release Date : 2014-06-23
✏Pages : 178
✏ISBN : 1500294683
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏Divine Comedy I Book Summary : The Divine Comedy describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and of another of his works, La Vita Nuova. While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and knowledge to appreciate. Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui manco possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142). His glory, by whose might all things are mov'd, Pierces the universe, and in one part Sheds more resplendence, elsewhere less. In heav'n, That largeliest of his light partakes, was I, Witness of things, which to relate again Surpasseth power of him who comes from thence; For that, so near approaching its desire Our intellect is to such depth absorb'd, That memory cannot follow. Nathless all, That in my thoughts I of that sacred realm Could store, shall now be matter of my song. Benign Apollo! this last labour aid, And make me such a vessel of thy worth, As thy own laurel claims of me belov'd. Thus far hath one of steep Parnassus' brows Suffic'd me; henceforth there is need of both For my remaining enterprise Do thou Enter into my bosom, and there breathe So, as when Marsyas by thy hand was dragg'd Forth from his limbs unsheath'd. O power divine! If thou to me of shine impart so much, That of that happy realm the shadow'd form Trac'd in my thoughts I may set forth to view, Thou shalt behold me of thy favour'd tree Come to the foot, and crown myself with leaves; For to that honour thou, and my high theme Will fit me. If but seldom, mighty Sire! To grace his triumph gathers thence a wreath Caesar or bard (more shame for human wills Deprav'd) joy to the Delphic god must spring From the Pierian foliage, when one breast Is with such thirst inspir'd. From a small spark Great flame hath risen: after me perchance Others with better voice may pray, and gain From the Cirrhaean city answer kind.

✏Book Title : The Divine Comedy Unabridged
✏Author : Dante Alighieri
✏Publisher :
✏Release Date : 2017-03-16
✏Pages : 476
✏ISBN : 1544718764
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Divine Comedy Unabridged Book Summary : The Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri's poetic masterpiece, is a moving human drama, an unforgettable visionary journey through the infinite torment of Hell, up the arduous slopes of Purgatory, and on to the glorious realm of Paradise-the sphere of universal harmony and eternal salvation.Divine Comedy began as a project in 1308 and ended in 1320, the year before Dante's death. The Divine Comedy is a highly allegorical text and renowned as one of the most influential Italian masterpieces in literature. This classic translation by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) was the first to be published by an American author and is a staple in every library. With this accurate and eloquent translation, the beauty of Dante's amazing epic poetry can be fully appreciated.

📒14th Century Christian Texts ✍ General Books LLC

✏Book Title : 14th Century Christian Texts
✏Author : General Books LLC
✏Publisher : Books LLC, Wiki Series
✏Release Date : 2010-05
✏Pages : 108
✏ISBN : 1156707358
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏14th Century Christian Texts Book Summary : Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 36. Chapters: Divine Comedy, Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso, Wycliffe's Bible, The Cloud of Unknowing, Revelations of Divine Love, Sibyllenbuch fragment, Sister Catherine Treatise, Codex Cumanicus, Vatican Croatian Prayer Book, Little Flowers of St. Francis. Excerpt: Inferno (Italian for "Hell") is the first part of Dante Alighieri's 14th-century epic poem Divine Comedy. It is followed by Purgatorio and Paradiso. It is an allegory telling of the journey of Dante through what is largely the medieval concept of Hell, guided by the Roman poet Virgil. In the poem, Hell is depicted as nine circles of suffering located within the Earth. Allegorically, the Divine Comedy represents the journey of the soul towards God, with the Inferno describing the recognition and rejection of sin. The poem begins on the day before Good Friday in the year 1300. The narrator, Dante himself, is thirty-five years old, and thus "halfway along our life's path" (Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita)-half of the Biblical life expectancy of seventy (Psalm 90:10). The poet finds himself lost in a dark wood in front of a mountain, assailed by three beasts (a lion, a lonza (rendered as "leopard" or "leopon"), and a she-wolf) he cannot evade, and unable to find the "straight way" (diritta via)-also translatable as "right way"-to salvation. Conscious that he is ruining himself and that he is falling into a "deep place" (basso loco) where the sun is silent (l sol tace), Dante is at last rescued by the Roman poet Virgil, who claims to have been sent by Beatrice, and the two of them begin their journey to the underworld. Each sin's punishment in Inferno is a contrapasso, a symbolic instance of poetic justice; for example, fortune-tellers have to walk forwards with their heads on backwards, unable to see what is ahead, because they tried, through forbidden means, to look ...

✏Book Title : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri
✏Author : Robert M. Durling
✏Publisher : Oxford University Press
✏Release Date : 2010-10-07
✏Pages : 888
✏ISBN : 0199723354
✏Available Language : English, Spanish, And French

✏The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri Book Summary : Robert Durling's spirited new prose translation of the Paradiso completes his masterful rendering of the Divine Comedy. Durling's earlier translations of the Inferno and the Purgatorio garnered high praise, and with this superb version of the Paradiso readers can now traverse the entirety of Dante's epic poem of spiritual ascent with the guidance of one of the greatest living Italian-to-English translators. Reunited with his beloved Beatrice in the Purgatorio, in the Paradiso the poet-narrator journeys with her through the heavenly spheres and comes to know "the state of blessed souls after death." As with the previous volumes, the original Italian and its English translation appear on facing pages. Readers will be drawn to Durling's precise and vivid prose, which captures Dante's extraordinary range of expression--from the high style of divine revelation to colloquial speech, lyrical interludes, and scornful diatribes against corrupt clergy. This edition boasts several unique features. Durling's introduction explores the chief interpretive issues surrounding the Paradiso, including the nature of its allegories, the status in the poem of Dante's human body, and his relation to the mystical tradition. The notes at the end of each canto provide detailed commentary on historical, theological, and literary allusions, and unravel the obscurity and difficulties of Dante's ambitious style . An unusual feature is the inclusion of the text, translation, and commentary on one of Dante's chief models, the famous cosmological poem by Boethius that ends the third book of his Consolation of Philosophy. A substantial section of Additional Notes discusses myths, symbols, and themes that figure in all three cantiche of Dante's masterpiece. Finally, the volume includes a set of indexes that is unique in American editions, including Proper Names Discussed in the Notes (with thorough subheadings concerning related themes), Passages Cited in the Notes, and Words Discussed in the Notes, as well as an Index of Proper Names in the text and translation. Like the previous volumes, this final volume includes a rich series of illustrations by Robert Turner.