Nothing

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  • Author : New Scientist
  • Publisher : The Experiment
  • Pages : 266 pages
  • ISBN : 1615192050
  • Rating : /5 from reviews
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Download or Read online Nothing full in PDF, ePub and kindle. this book written by New Scientist and published by The Experiment which was released on 15 April 2014 with total page 266 pages. We cannot guarantee that Nothing book is available in the library, click Get Book button and read full online book in your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile whenever and wherever You Like. Incredible discoveries from the fringes of the universe to the inner workings of our mindsÑall from nothing! It turns out that almost nothing is as curiousÑor as enlighteningÑas, well, nothing. What is nothingness? Where can it be found? The writers of the world's top-selling science magazine investigateÑfrom the big bang, dark energy, and the void to superconductors, vestigial organs, hypnosis, and the placebo effectÑand discover that understanding nothing may be the key to understanding everything: What came before the big bang, and will our universe end? How might cooling matter down almost to absolute zero help solve our energy crisis? How can someone suffer from a false diagnosis as though it were true? Does nothingness even exist? Recent experiments suggest that squeezing a perfect vacuum somehow creates light. Why is it unfair to accuse slothsÑanimals who do nothingÑof being lazy? And more! Contributors Paul Davies, Jo Marchant, and Ian Stewart, along with two former editors of Nature and 16 other leading writers and scientists, marshal up-to-the-minute research to make one of the most perplexing realms in science dazzlingly clear. Prepare to be amazed at how much more there is to nothing than you ever realized.

How to Be Human

How to Be Human
  • Author : New Scientist
  • Publisher : Hachette UK
  • Release : 21 September 2017
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If you thought you knew who you were, THINK AGAIN. Did you know that half your DNA isn't human? That somebody, somewhere has exactly the same face? Or that most of your memories are fiction? What about the fact that you are as hairy as a chimpanzee, various parts of your body don't belong to you, or that you can read other people's minds? Do you really know why you blush, yawn and cry? Why 90 per cent of laughter has

Nothing

Nothing
  • Author : New Scientist
  • Publisher : The Experiment
  • Release : 15 April 2014
GET THIS BOOK Nothing

Incredible discoveries from the fringes of the universe to the inner workings of our mindsÑall from nothing! It turns out that almost nothing is as curiousÑor as enlighteningÑas, well, nothing. What is nothingness? Where can it be found? The writers of the world's top-selling science magazine investigateÑfrom the big bang, dark energy, and the void to superconductors, vestigial organs, hypnosis, and the placebo effectÑand discover that understanding nothing may be the key to understanding everything:

New Scientist

New Scientist
  • Author : Graham Lawton,Stephen Hawking
  • Publisher : John Murray
  • Release : 08 March 2018
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Introduction by Professor Stephen Hawking. When Edwin Hubble looked into his telescope in the 1920s, he was shocked to find that nearly all of the galaxies he could see through it were flying away from one another. If these galaxies had always been travelling, he reasoned, then they must, at some point, have been on top of one another. This discovery transformed the debate about one of the most fundamental questions of human existence - how did the universe begin?

The Brain

The Brain
  • Author : New Scientist
  • Publisher : John Murray
  • Release : 05 March 2020
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Join New Scientist on a mind-expanding rollercoaster ride through intelligence, creativity, your unconscious and beyond. Congratulations! You're the proud owner of the most complex information processing device in the known universe. The human brain comes equipped with all sorts of useful design features, but also many bugs and weaknesses. Problem is you don't get an owner's manual. You have to just plug and play. As a result,most of us never properly understand how our brains work and what they're

The Brain

The Brain
  • Author : Alison George,Scientist New
  • Publisher : John Murray
  • Release : 29 July 2021
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Congratulations! You're the proud owner of the most complex information processing device in the known universe. The human brain comes equipped with all sorts of useful design features, but also many bugs and weaknesses. Problem is you don't get an owner's manual. You have to just plug and play. As a result, most of us never properly understand how our brains work and what they're truly capable of. We fail get the best out of them, ignore some of their

Why Don t Penguins Feet Freeze

Why Don t Penguins  Feet Freeze
  • Author : Mick O'Hare
  • Publisher : Profile Books
  • Release : 29 July 2021
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Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze? is the latest compilation of readers' answers to the questions in the 'Last Word' column of New Scientist, the world's best-selling science weekly. Following the phenomenal success of Does Anything Eat Wasps? - the Christmas 2005 surprise bestseller - this new collection includes recent answers never before published in book form, and also old favourites from the column's early days. Yet again, many seemingly simple questions turn out to have complex answers. And some that seem

New Scientist The Origin of almost Everything

New Scientist  The Origin of  almost  Everything
  • Author : New Scientist,Stephen Hawking,Graham Lawton
  • Publisher : Hachette UK
  • Release : 22 September 2016
GET THIS BOOK New Scientist The Origin of almost Everything

Introduction by Professor Stephen Hawking. When Edwin Hubble looked into his telescope in the 1920s, he was shocked to find that nearly all of the galaxies he could see through it were flying away from one another. If these galaxies had always been travelling, he reasoned, then they must, at some point, have been on top of one another. This discovery transformed the debate about one of the most fundamental questions of human existence - how did the universe begin?

New Scientist The Origin of almost Everything

New Scientist  The Origin of  almost  Everything
  • Author : New Scientist,Graham Lawton
  • Publisher : Nicholas Brealey
  • Release : 25 October 2016
GET THIS BOOK New Scientist The Origin of almost Everything

From what actually happened in the Big Bang to the accidental discovery of post-it notes, the history of science is packed with surprising discoveries. Did you know, for instance, that if you were to get too close to a black hole it would suck you up like a noodle (it's called spaghettification), why your keyboard is laid out in QWERTY (it's not to make it easier to type) or why animals never evolved wheels? New Scientist does. And now they

How to Make a Tornado

How to Make a Tornado
  • Author : New Scientist
  • Publisher : Hachette UK
  • Release : 01 September 2016
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Science tells us grand things about the universe: how fast light travels, and why stones fall to earth. But scientific endeavour goes far beyond these obvious foundations. There are some fields we don't often hear about because they are so specialised, or turn out to be dead ends. Yet researchers have given hallucinogenic drugs to blind people (seriously), tried to weigh the soul as it departs the body and planned to blast a new Panama Canal with atomic weapons. Real

Why Can t Elephants Jump

Why Can t Elephants Jump
  • Author : New Scientist
  • Publisher : Hachette UK
  • Release : 01 September 2016
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Well, why not? Is it because elephants are too large or heavy (after all, they say hippos and rhinos can play hopscotch)? Or is it because their knees face the wrong way? Or do they just wait until no one's looking? Read this brilliant new compilation to find out. This is popular science at its most absorbing and enjoyable. That is why the previous titles in the New Scientist series have been international bestsellers and sold over two million copies